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Anafranil

No Prescription

Anafranil is an antidepressant. Anafranil is prescribed to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Anafranil works by increasing the amount of serotonin, a natural substance in the brain that is needed to maintain mental balance.
Anafranil is prescribed to treat people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (a condition that causes repeated unwanted thoughts and the need to perform certain behaviors over and over).
Anafranil is in a group of drugs called tricyclic antidepressants.

Contraindications

Anafranil is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- An alcohol problem;
- Asthma, difficulty breathing;
- Bipolar disease or schizophrenia;
- Difficulty passing urine, prostate trouble;
- Glaucoma;
- Heart disease or previous heart attack;
- Liver disease;
- Over active thyroid;
- Seizures;
- Thoughts or plans of suicide, previous suicide attempt, or family history of suicide attempt;
- An unusual or allergic reaction to Anafranil, other drugs, foods, dyes, or preservatives;
- Pregnant or trying to get pregnant;
- Breast-feeding;
- Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Anafranil other tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil) amoxapine (Asendin) desipramine (Norpramin) doxepin (Adapin Sinequan) imipramine (Tofranil) nortriptyline (Aventyl Pamelor) protriptyline (Vivactil) and trimipramine (Surmontil) any other medications or any of the inactive ingredients in Anafranil capsules Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of the inactive ingredients;
- Tell your doctor if you are taking a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan) phenelzine (Nardil) selegiline (Eldepryl Emsam Zelapar) and tranylcypromine (Parnate) or if you have stopped taking an MAO inhibitor within the past 14 days Your doctor will probably tell you not to take Anafranil If you stop taking Anafranil you should wait at least 14 days before you start to take an MAO inhibitor;
- Tell your doctor and pharmacist what script and nonscript medications vitamins nutritional supplements and herbal products you are taking or plan to take Be sure to mention any of the following: anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin) benztropine (Cogentin) cimetidine (Tagamet) clonidine (Catapres) dicyclomine (Bentyl) digoxin (Lanoxin) disulfiram flecainide (Tambocor) guanethidine (Ismelin) haloperidol (Haldol) levodopa (Sinemet Dopar) medications;
- Tell your doctor if you have recently had a heart attack Your doctor may tell you that you should not take Anafranil;
- Tell your doctor if you are being treated with electroshock therapy (procedure in which small electric shocks are administered to the brain to treat certain mental illnesses) if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol and if you have or have ever had seizures brain damage problems with your urinary system or prostate (a male reproductive organ) glaucoma (an eye condition) irregular heartbeat problems with your blood pressure thyroid problems or heart kidney or liver diseas;
- Tell your doctor if you are pregnant plan to become pregnant or are breast-feeding If you become pregnant while taking Anafranil call your doctor;
- If you are having surgery including dental surgery tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking Anafranil;
- You should know that this medication may make you drowsy and may increase the risk that you will have a seizure Do not drive a car operate machinery swim or climb until you know how this medication affects you;
- Remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication;

Interactions

Do not take Anafranil with any of the following drugs:
- Amoxapine;
- Arsenic trioxide;
- Certain heart drugs;
- Cisapride;
- Halofantrine;
- Levomethadyl;
- MAOIs like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate;
- Other drugs for mental depression;
- Phenothiazines like perphenazine, thioridazine and chlorpromazine;
- Pimozide;
- Probucol;
- Procarbazine;
- Sparfloxacin;
- St John's Wort;
- Ziprasidone;
- Atropine and related drugs like hyoscyamine, scopolamine, tolterodine and others;
- Barbiturate drugs for inducing sleep or treating seizures like phenobarbital;
- Cimetidine;
- Clonidine;
- Digoxin;
- Drugs for anxiety or sleeping problems;
- Drugs for colds, flu and breathing difficulties, like pseudoephedrine;
- Drugs for hay fever or allergies;
- Seizure or epilepsy drug like phenytoin;
- Stimulants like dexmethylphenidate or methylphenidate;
- Thyroid hormones;
- Warfarin;

Side Effects

Anafranil side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue;
- Breast enlargement, milk;
- Breathing problems;
- Confusion, hallucinations;
- Fast, irregular heartbeat;
- Fever with increased sweating;
- Muscle stiffness, spasms;
- Pain or difficulty passing urine, loss of bladder control;
- Seizures;
- Suicidal thoughts or other mood changes;
- Swelling of the testicles;
- Tingling, pain, or numbness in the feet or hands;
- Yellowing of the eyes or skin;
- Change in sex drive or performance;
- Constipation, or diarrhea;
- Nausea, vomiting;
- Weight gain or loss`;
- Drowsiness;
- Dry mouth;
- Nausea;
- Vomiting;
- Diarrhea;
- Constipation;
- Nervousness;
- Decreased sexual ability;
- Decreased memory or concentration;
- Headache;
- Stuffy nose;
- Change in appetite or weight;
- Uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body;
- Seizures;
- Fast irregular or pounding heartbeat;
- Difficulty urinating or loss of bladder control;
- Believing things that are not true;
- Hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist);
- Eye pain;
- Shakiness;
- Difficulty breathing or fast breathing;
- Severe muscle stiffness;
- Unusual tiredness or weakness;
- Sore throat fever and other signs of infection;

Overdose

Reported Anafranil overdose symptoms are:
- Seizures;
- Coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time);
- Drowsiness;
- Restlessness;
- Loss of coordination;
- Sweating;
- Stiff muscles;
- Unusual movements;
- Fast heartbeat;
- Slowed breathing;
- Blue discoloration of the skin;
- Fever;
- Widened pupils (dark circles in the center of the eye);

Dosage

For ADULTS

The usual recommended initial dose is 25 mg daily. Your doctor may gradually increase this dosage to 100 mg during the first 2 weeks. During this period you will be asked to take this drug, divided into smaller doses, with meals. The maximum daily dosage is 250 mg. After the dose has been determined, your doctor may direct you to take a single dose at bedtime, to avoid sleepiness during the day.

For CHILDREN

The usual recommended initial dose is 25 mg daily, divided into smaller doses and taken with meals. Your doctor may gradually increase the dose to a maximum of 100 mg or 3 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day, whichever is smaller. The maximum dose is 200 mg or 3 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight, whichever is smaller. Once the dose has been determined, the child can take it in a single dose at bedtime.

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