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Ditropan

No Prescription

Ditropan is prescribed to treat overactive bladder. Ditropan reduces the amount of bathroom visits. Ditropan may also help to control wetting accidents.
Ditropan is in a class of drugs called anticholinergics.
Ditropan is prescribed to control urgent, frequent, or uncontrolled urination in people who have overactive bladder (a condition in which the bladder muscles have uncontrollable spasms), spina bifida, or other conditions that affect the bladder muscles.
Ditropan works by relaxing the bladder muscles to prevent urgent, frequent, or uncontrolled urination.

Contraindications

Ditropan is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- Dementia;
- Difficulty passing urine;
- Glaucoma;
- Intestinal obstruction;
- Kidney disease;
- Liver disease;
- An unusual or allergic reaction to Ditropan, other drugs, foods, dyes, or preservatives;
- Pregnant or trying to get pregnant;
- Breast-feeding;
- Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Ditropan or any other medications.
- Tell your doctor and pharmacist what script and nonscript medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) certain antibiotics such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin), and tetracycline (Bristamycin, Sumycin, Tetrex) certain antifungals such as itraconazole (Sporanox),miconazole (Monistat), and ketoconazole (Nizoral) antihistamines aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn) cimetidine (Tagamet) diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac) fluvoxamine ipratropium (Atrovent) iron supplements certain medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) such as indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), and ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra) medications for irritable bowel disease, motion sickness, Parkinson's disease, ulcers, or urinary problems medications for osteoporosis (a condition in which bones are weak, fragile, and can break easily) such as alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), and risedronate (Actonel) nefazodone potassium supplements quinidine and verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
- Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had ulcerative colitis (sores in the intestine that cause stomach pain and diarrhea) gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD condition in which the contents of the stomach back up into the esophagus and cause pain and heartburn) hiatal hernia (condition in which a portion of the wall of the stomach bulges outward, and may cause pain and heartburn) hyperthyroidism (condition in which there is too much thyroid hormone in the body) myasthenia gravis (a disorder of the nervous system that causes muscle weakness) fast or irregular heartbeat high blood pressure or heart, liver, or kidney disease.
- Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Ditropan, call your doctor.
- If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking Ditropan.
- You should know that this medication may make you drowsy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
- Talk to your doctor about the safe use of alcohol while you are taking this medication. Alcohol can make the side effects from Ditropan worse.

Interactions

Do not take Ditropan with any of the following drugs:
- Antihistamines for allergy, cough and cold;
- Atropine;
- Certain drugs for bladder problems like Ditropan, tolterodine;
- Certain drugs for Parkinson's disease like benztropine, trihexyphenidyl;
- Certain drugs for stomach problems like dicyclomine, hyoscyamine;
- Certain drugs for travel sickness like scopolamine;
- Clarithromycin;
- Erythromycin;
- Ipratropium;
- Drugs for fungal infections, like fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole or voriconazole;

Side Effects

Ditropan side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue;
- Agitation;
- Breathing problems;
- Confusion;
- Fever;
- Flushing (reddening of the skin);
- Hallucinations;
- Memory loss;
- Pain or difficulty passing urine;
- Palpitations;
- Unusually weak or tired;
- Constipation;
- Headache;
- Sexual difficulties (impotence);
- Dry mouth;
- Blurred vision;
- Dry eyes nose or skin;
- Stomach pain;
- Constipation;
- Diarrhea;
- Nausea;
- Heartburn;
- Change in ability to taste food;
- Headache;
- Dizziness;
- Weakness;
- Confusion;
- Sleepiness;
- Difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep;
- Nervousness;
- Flushing;
- Swelling of the hands arms feet ankles or lower legs;
- Back or joint pain;
- Frequent urgent or painful urination;

Overdose

Reported Ditropan overdose symptoms are:
- Restlessness;
- Uncontrollable shaking of a part of your body;
- Irritability;
- Seizures;
- Confusion;
- Hallucinations (seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist);
- Flushing;
- Fever;
- Irregular heartbeat;
- Vomiting;
- Difficulty urinating;
- Slowed or difficult breathing;
- Inability to move;
- Coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time);
- Memory loss;
- Agitation;
- Wide pupils (black circles in the centers of the eyes);

Dosage

Adults

The usual dose is one 5-mg tablet or 1 teaspoonful of syrup taken 2 to 3 times a day, but not more than 4 times a day.

Children over 5 Years of Age

The usual dose is one 5-mg tablet or 1 teaspoonful of syrup taken 2 times a day, but not more than 3 times a day. Ditropan is not recommended for children under 5.

Ditropan XL

Adults

The recommended starting dose is 5 or 10 mg once a day. If this proves insufficient, the doctor may increase the dose by 5 mg at weekly intervals, up to a maximum of 30 mg a day.

Children 6 Years of Age and Older

The recommended starting dose is 5 mg once a day. If this proves insufficient, the doctor may increase the dose by 5-mg increments, up to a maximum of 20 mg a day.

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