Read before buying drugs   
RXMedsDoctor.net

Select Drugs:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Z

Irbesartan

No Prescription

Irbesartan can be combined with yet other blood pressure medicines if your pressure remains too high.
Irbesartan does not cure high blood pressure, it merely keeps it under control.
Irbesartan is a combination medication prescribed to treat high blood pressure.
Combinations such as Irbesartan are usually prescribed only when treatment with a single medication fails to lower blood pressure sufficiently.
If you have high blood pressure, you must take Irbesartan regularly for it to be effective.
One component, irbesartan, belongs to a class of blood pressure medications that prevents the hormone angiotensin II from constricting the blood vessels, thereby allowing blood to flow more freely and keeping blood pressure down.
Since blood pressure declines gradually, it may be several weeks before you get the full benefit of Irbesartan and you must continue taking it even if you are feeling well.
The other component, hydrochlorothiazide, is a diuretic that increases the output of urine, removing excess fluid from the body and thus lowering blood pressure.

Side Effects

Irbesartan side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:

More common side effects may include:
- Vomiting;
- Swelling due to water retention;
- Nausea;
- Muscle and bone pain;
- Influenza;
- Fatigue;
- Dizziness;

Less common side effects may include:
- Urinary tract infection;
- Upper respiratory infection;
- Swelling in the mouth or face;
- Sore throat;
- Sinus abnormality;
- Runny nose;
- Rash;
- Rapid heartbeat;
- Nervousness;
- Muscle cramps;
- Jaundice (yellow skin or eyes);
- Indigestion and heartburn;
- Hives;
- Headache;
- Dizziness when standing up;
- Diarrhea;
- Cough;
- Chest pain;
- Anxiety;
- Allergy;
- Abnormal urination;
- Abdominal pain;

Contraindications

Irbesartan is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- If Irbesartan gives you an allergic reaction;
- If you actually faint;
- If you are already taking insulin or oral diabetes drugs;
- If you have an allergy to sulfa drugs;
- If you have bronchial asthma or a history of allergies;
- If you have liver or kidney disease, diabetes, gout, or lupus erythematosus;
- If your blood pressure drops excessively, you may feel light-headed or faint, especially during the first few days of therapy;
- If your body is short of fluid;
- If you're unable to urinate;

Interactions

Do not take Irbesartan with any of the following drugs:
- Steroids such as prednisone;
- Other blood pressure medications such as procardia xl and tenormin;
- Oral diabetes drugs such as diabinese, diabeta, and glucotrol;
- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aleve, anaprox, and motrin;
- Narcotic painkillers such as demerol, tylenol with codeine, and percocet;
- Lithium (eskalith, lithobid);
- Insulin;
- Colestipol (colestid);
- Cholestyramine (questran);
- Barbiturates such as phenobarbital and seconal;
- Adrenocorticotropic hormone (acth);

Dosage

Irbesartan tablets come in two strengths:
300 milligrams irbesartan with 12.5 milligrams hydrochlorothiazide
150 milligrams irbesartan with 12.5 milligrams hydrochlorothiazide

ADULTS

It will take 2 to 4 weeks for Irbesartan to reach its maximum effectiveness.
The usual starting dose of Irbesartan is 1 lower-strength tablet daily.
If your blood pressure does not respond to the initial dosage, your doctor may increase the dosage to 1 higher-strength tablet or 2 lower-strength tablets taken once a day.

Overdose

Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences.
Information on Irbesartan overdosage is limited, but extremely low blood pressure and an unusually rapid or slow heartbeat are likely signs of an overdose.

Other signs may include:
- Confusion;
- Dry mouth;
- Excessive thirst;
- Muscle cramps;
- Nausea;
- Restlessness;
- Weakness;
(c) 2017