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Minipress

No Prescription

Minipress is prescribed for congestive heart failure or Raynaud's disease.
Minipress is prescribed in males for symptoms of prostate enlargement such as urinary hesitancy and/or urgency.
Minipress is prescribed to treat high blood pressure. It is effective prescribed alone or with other high blood pressure medications such as diuretics or beta-blocking medications (drugs that ease heart contractions) such as Tenormin.

Minipress is also prescribed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an abnormal enlargement of the prostate gland.

Side Effects.

Minipress side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Weakness;
- Palpitations (Pounding Heartbeat);
- Nausea;
- Lack Of Energy;
- Headache;
- Drowsiness;
- Dizziness;
- Constipation;
- Dizziness;
- Drowsiness;
- Fatigue;
- Headache;
- Loss of appetite;
- Nasal congestion or dry eyes;

Inform your doctor promptly if you develop:
- Chest pain;
- Difficulty breathing;
- Difficulty urinating;
- Ringing in the ears;
- Skin rash;
- Swelling of the hands or feet;

Males - though it is unlikely to occur, if you get a painful, prolonged erection, stop using this drug and seek immediate medical attention.

Dosage

ADULTS

Dosages of this drug should be adjusted by your doctor according to your response.

The usual starting dose is 1 mg, 2 or 3 times per day.

The doctor may slowly increase the amount to as much as 20 mg per day, divided into smaller doses. The typical dose is 6 mg to 15 mg per day, divided into smaller doses. Although doses higher than 20 mg per day usually have no extra effect, some people may benefit from a daily dose of 40 mg, divided into smaller doses.

If Minipress is prescribed with a diuretic or other high blood pressure drug, the dose can be reduced to 1 to 2 mg, 3 times a day.

CHILDREN

Safety and effectiveness of this drug have not been established in children.

(c) 2017