Read before buying drugs   
RXMedsDoctor.net

Select Drugs:
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Z

Pepcid

No Prescription

Pepcid belongs to a wide class of medicines that are known as histamine receptor antagonists.
Pepcid can also treat GERD (gastro esophageal reflux disease), a medical conditions that is known to cause unpleasant heartburn.
Pepcid is prescribed to patients who are suffering from intestine or stomach ulcer (this drug has proven its effectiveness both in the treatment and in the prevention of such disorders).
Such medicines are known to effectively decrease the amount of acid that is produced by the patient's stomach.

Pepcid is prescribed for the short-term treatment of active duodenal ulcer (in the upper intestine) for 4 to 8 weeks and for active, benign gastric ulcer (in the stomach) for 6 to 8 weeks. It is prescribed for maintenance therapy, at reduced dosage, after a duodenal ulcer has healed. It is also prescribed for short-term treatment of GERD, a condition in which the acid contents of the stomach flow back into the food canal (esophagus), and for resulting inflammation of the esophagus. And it is prescribed for certain diseases that cause the stomach to produce excessive quantities of acid, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Pepcid belongs to a class of drugs known as histamine H 2 blockers.

An over-the-counter formulation, Pepcid AC, is prescribed to relieve and prevent heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach.

Contraindications

Pepcid is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- Black or bloody stools;
- Bloody vomit;
- Kidney disorder;
- Liver disorder;
- Pain or trouble swallowing food;

Side Effects

Pepcid side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Allergic reaction (hives throat closure difficulty breathing swelling of the tongue, lips, or face);
- Bleeding gums;
- Dizziness;
- Easy or abnormal bleeding or bruising;
- Headache;
- Irregular heartbeat;
- Nausea, diarrhea, or constipation;
- Rash;
- Yellowing of the eyes or skin;

Pepcid side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Headache;

Overdose

Reported Pepcid overdose symptoms are:
- A fast heartbeat;
- Diarrhea;
- Difficulty breathing;
- Increased production of saliva;
- Nausea;
- Vomiting;

Other Brand Names

In some countries Pepcid may also be known as:
- Acid Control;
- Acid Halt;
- Amfamox;
- Ansilan;
- Apogastine;
- Ausfam;
- Banatin;
- Beilande;
- Confobos;
- Dinamot;
- Dispromil;
- Duovel;
- Eradix;
- Esseldon;
- Fadul;
- Famo;
- Famobeta;
- Famohexal;
- Famonerton;
- Famotid;
- Famotidine;
- Famotil;
- Famox;
- Ganor;
- Gasterogen;
- Gastro;
- Gastropen;
- H2 Bloc;
- Hista-Bloc;
- Imposergon;
- Klinotal;
- Mostrelan;
- Motiax;
- Neutracid;
- Panalba;
- Pepcidine;
- Pepcidine;
- Pepdif;
- Peptigal;
- Pepzan;
- Quamatel;
- Rogasti;
- Rosagenus;
- Sedanium-R;
- Sodexx;
- Ulcelac;
- Ulcenol;
- Ulcusan;
- Ulfamid;
- Ulfinol;
- Ultra Heartburn Relief;
- Vexurat;
- Vida Famodine;

Dosage.

ADULTS

Duodenal Ulcer

The usual starting dose is 40 mg or 5 ml (1 teaspoonful) once a day at bedtime. Results should be seen within 4 weeks, and this medication should not be prescribed at full dosage longer than 6 to 8 weeks. Your doctor may have you take 20 mg or 2.5 ml (half a teaspoonful) twice a day. The normal maintenance dose after your ulcer has healed is 20 mg or 2.5 ml (half a teaspoonful) once a day at bedtime.

Benign Gastric Ulcer

The usual dose is 40 mg or 5 ml (1 teaspoonful) once a day at bedtime.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

The usual dose is 20 mg or 2.5 ml (1/2 teaspoonful) twice a day for up to 6 weeks. For inflammation of the esophagus due to GERD, the dose is 20 or 40 mg or 2.5 to 5 ml twice a day for up to 12 weeks.

Excess Acid Conditions (such as Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome)

The usual starting dose is 20 mg every 6 hours, although some people need a higher dose. Doses of up to 160 mg every 6 hours have been given in severe cases.

If your kidneys are not functioning properly, your doctor will adjust the dosage.

CHILDREN 1 TO 16 YEARS OLD

Peptic Ulcer

The usual daily dose is 0.5 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight. The entire dose may be given at bedtime, or divided and given in 2 smaller doses. Do not give more than 40 mg per day.

If your child's kidneys are not functioning properly, your doctor will adjust the dosage.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

The usual daily dose is 1 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight, divided and given in 2 smaller doses. Do not exceed 40 mg daily.

If your child's kidneys are not functioning properly, your doctor will adjust the dosage.

INFANTS UNDER 12 MONTHS OLD

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

The usual starting dose of the oral suspension is 0.5 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight once a day for infants under 3 months and twice a day for infants 3 to 11 months. The dosage can be given for up to 8 weeks. Your doctor may also recommend additional measures to relieve the symptoms, such as thickening the child's food.

If your child's kidneys are not functioning properly, your doctor will adjust the dosage.
Pepcid AC

Do not give Pepcid AC to children under 12 years old unless your doctor approves. Swallow tablets or gelcaps with a glass of water. Chew the chewable tablets completely; do not swallow them whole. Do not take more than 2 pills a day or take them for longer than 2 weeks unless your doctor approves.

For Prevention

Take 1 tablet, gelcap, or chewable tablet 15 minutes or more before eating a meal that could cause heartburn.

For Relief

Take 1 tablet, gelcap, or chewable tablet.
(c) 2017