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Precose

Form.

Tablets: 25 milligrams,
Tablets: 50 milligrams,
Tablets: 100 milligrams.

No Prescription

Precose is prescribed to control blood glucose (sugar) levels in type II diabetes.
Precose is prescribed alone to treat type II diabetes or can be combined with sulfonylureas such as glyburide (Diabeta) or metformin (Glucophage) or with insulin.
Precose is an oral medication prescribed to treat type 2 (noninsulin-dependent) diabetes when high blood sugar levels cannot be controlled by diet alone. Precose works by slowing the body's digestion of carbohydrates so that blood sugar levels won't surge upward after a meal. Precose may be taken alone or in combination with certain other diabetes medications such as Diabinese, Micronase, Glucophage, and Insulin.

Dosage.

The initial Precose dose may start 25 milligrams three times daily and then increase after four to eight weeks to 50-100 milligrams three times daily. Precose should be taken at the first bite of each meal.

Smaller doses may be adequate for patients with severe kidney dysfunction or liver disease. Precose is not recommended if cirrhosis is present. Precose therapy is not advised in the presence of certain medical conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease or intestinal obstruction and chronic intestinal diseases that interfere with digestion or absorption such as Crohn's disease.

Precose doses should be adjusted based upon blood glucose levels taken one hour after a meal and blood HbA1c levels taken about three months after starting or changing the dose. (HbA1c is a chemical in the blood that is a good indicator of blood glucose control.)

ADULTS

The recommended starting dose of Precose is 25 mg (half of a 50-mg tablet) 3 times a day, taken with the first bite of each main meal. Some people need to work up to this dose gradually and start with 25 mg only once a day. Your doctor will adjust your dosage at 4- to 8-week intervals, based on blood tests and your individual response to Precose. The doctor may increase the medication to 50 mg 3 times a day or, if needed, 100 mg 3 times a day. You should not take more than this amount. If you weigh less than 132 pounds, the maximum dosage is 50 mg 3 times a day.

If you are also taking another oral antidiabetic medication or insulin and you show signs of low blood sugar, your doctor will adjust the dosage of both medications.

CHILDREN

Safety and effectiveness of Precose in children have not been established.

Side Effects.

The most common side effects with Precose therapy are:
- Flatulence;
- Diarrhea;
- Abdominal pain;

There is a rare possibility that these gastrointestinal side effects may become severe and progress to paralytic ileus.

Other possible but rare side effects are:
- Decreases in hematocrit;
- Calcium or vitamin B6 levels;
- An increase in liver enzymes;

Precose side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Gas;
- Diarrhea;
- Abdominal Pain;
(c) 2017