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Prozac

No Prescription

Prozac belongs to a class of drugs known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Prozac helps to treat mood problems such as depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and panic attacks. Prozac can also treat certain eating disorders.
Prozac is prescribed to treat:
- Depression;
- Obsessive-compulsive disorder (bothersome thoughts that won't go away and the need to perform certain actions over and over);
- Panic attacks (sudden, unexpected attacks of extreme fear and worry about these attacks);
- Some eating disorders;

Prozac is prescribed to relieve the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder including:
- Bloating;
- Breast tenderness;
- Irritability;
- Mood swings;

Prozac works by increasing the amount of serotonin, a natural substance in the brain that helps maintain mental balance.
Prozac is in a class of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

Contraindications

Prozac is contraindicated if you have any of the following conditions:
- Bipolar disorder or mania;
- Diabetes;
- Liver disease;
- Psychosis;
- Seizures;
- Suicidal thoughts or history of attempted suicide;
- An unusual or allergic reaction to Prozac, other drugs, foods, dyes, or preservatives;
- Pregnant or trying to get pregnant;
- Breast-feeding;
- Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Prozac or any other medications;
- Tell your doctor if you are taking pimozide (Orap)thioridazine or monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil) selegiline (Eldepryl Emsam Zelapar) and tranylcypromine (Parnate) or if you have stopped taking a monoamine oxidase inhibitor within the past 2 weeks Your doctor will probably tell you that you should not take Prozac If you stop taking Prozac you should wait at least 5 weeks before you begin to take thioridazine;
- Tell your doctor and pharmacist what other script and nonscript medications and vitamins you are taking or plan to take Be sure to mention any of the following: alprazolam (Xanax) anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin) antidepressants (mood elevators) such as amitriptyline (Elavil) amoxapine (Asendin) clomipramine (Anafranil) desipramine (Norpramin) doxepin imipramine (Tofranil) nortriptyline (Aventyl Pamelor) protriptyline (Vivactil) and trimipramin;
- Tell your doctor what nutritional supplements you are taking especially products that contain St John's wort or tryptophan;
- Tell your doctor if you are being treated with electroshock therapy (procedure in which small electric shocks are administered to the brain to treat certain mental illnesses) if you have recently had a heart attack and if you have or have ever had diabetes seizures or liver or heart disease;
- Tell your doctor if you are pregnant plan to become pregnant or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Prozac call your doctor;
- You should know that Prozac may make you drowsy Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you;

Interactions

Do not take Prozac with any of the following drugs:
- Other drugs containing Prozac, like Sarafem or Symbyax;
- Certain diet drugs like dexfenfluramine, fenfluramine, phentermine;
- Cisapride;
- Drugs called MAO Inhibitors like Carbex, Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, and Parnate;
- Pimozide;
- Procarbazine;
- St John's wort;
- Thioridazine;
- Tryptophan;
- Alcohol;
- Any other drugs for depression, anxiety, or psychotic disturbances;
- Aspirin and aspirin-like drugs;
- Carbamazepine;
- Cyproheptadine;
- Dextromethorphan;
- Flecainide;
- Lithium;
- Drugs for diabetes;
- Drugs for migraine headache, like sumatriptan;
- Drugs for sleep;
- Drugs that treat or prevent blood clots like warfarin, enoxaparin, and dalteparin;
- Metoprolol;
- NSAIDs, drugs for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen;
- Phenytoin;
- Propafenone;
- Propranolol;
- Vinblastine;

Side Effects

Prozac side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue;
- Breathing problems;
- Confusion;
- Fast or irregular heart rate, palpitations;
- Flu-like fever, chills, cough, muscle or joint aches and pains;
- Seizures;
- Suicidal thoughts or other mood changes;
- Tremors;
- Trouble sleeping;
- Unusual bleeding or bruising;
- Unusually tired or weak;
- Vomiting;
- Blurred vision;
- Change in sex drive or performance;
- Diarrhea;
- Dry mouth;
- Flushing;
- Headache;
- Increased or decreased appetite;
- Nausea;
- Sweating;
- Nervousness;
- Nausea;
- Dry mouth;
- Sore throat;
- Drowsiness;
- Weakness;
- Uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body;
- Loss of appetite;
- Weight loss;
- Changes in sex drive or ability;

Overdose

Reported Prozac overdose symptoms are:
- Unsteadiness;
- Confusion;
- Unresponsiveness;
- Nervousness;
- Uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body;
- Dizziness;
- Rapid irregular or pounding heartbeat;
- Seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist (hallucinating);
- Fever;
- Fainting;

Dosage

DEPRESSION

It may take 4 weeks before the full antidepressant effect of Prozac is seen.

Adults

The recommended starting dose is 20 mg a day, usually taken in the morning. If needed, the doctor may gradually increase the dose up to a maximum of 80 mg a day. The usual daily dose ranges from 20 to 60 mg. Daily doses above 20 mg should be taken in the morning or in two smaller doses taken in the morning and at noon.

Children 8 years and older

The usual starting dose is 10 or 20 mg a day. Children starting at 10 mg will have their dose increased to 20 mg a day after 1 week. Underweight children may need to remain at the 10-mg dose.

Prozac Weekly

You need to wait at least 7 days after stopping your daily dose of Prozac before switching to the once-weekly formulation. One Prozac Weekly capsule contains 90 mg of medication.

OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER

It may take 5 weeks before the full effects of Prozac are seen.

Adults

The recommended starting dose is 20 mg a day, usually taken in the morning. If needed, the doctor may gradually increase the dose up to a maximum of 80 mg a day. The usual daily dose ranges from 20 to 60 mg. Daily doses above 20 mg should be taken in the morning or in two smaller doses taken in the morning and at noon.

Children 7 years and older

The recommended starting dose is 10 mg a day. After 2 weeks, the doctor will increase the dose to 20 mg. If needed, the doctor may further increase the dose up to a maximum of 60 mg a day. The recommended dosage range for underweight children is 10 to 30 mg a day

BULIMIA

Adults

The recommended dose is 60 mg a day taken in the morning. The doctor may start you at a lower dose and gradually increase it over a period of several days.

PANIC DISORDER

Adults

The recommended starting dose is 10 mg a day. After 1 week, the doctor will increase the dose to 20 mg. If no improvement is seen after several weeks, the doctor may increase the dose to a maximum of 60 mg a day.

PREMENSTRUAL DYSPHORIC DISORDER

Adults

The usual dose of Sarafem is 20 mg a day. The doctor will instruct you to take the dose either every day of the month or only during the 2 weeks before menstruation begins (the luteal phase of your cycle). If there's no improvement after several weeks, the dose can be increased, usually to 60 mg a day. The maximum dose is 80 mg daily.

DOSAGE ADJUSTMENT

For all indications, the doctor may need to prescribe a lower dose if you are elderly, have liver disease, or are taking other medications.

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