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Viagra

Form.

Tablets: 25 milligrams,
Tablets: 50 milligrams,
Tablets: 100 milligrams.

No Prescription

Viagra is prescribed for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of either organic (medical condition) or psychogenic (psychological) cause and for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Viagra is an oral drug for male impotence, also known as erectile dysfunction (ED). It works by dilating blood vessels in the penis, allowing the inflow of blood needed for an erection.

Dosage.

Viagra is rapidly absorbed. Maximum observed plasma concentrations are reached within 30 to 120 minutes (median 60 minutes) of oral dosing in the fasted state. When Viagra is taken with a high fat meal, the rate of absorption is reduced, with an average delay in the time to maximal concentration of 1 hour.

Doses range from 25 mg to 100 mg, depending on the drug's effect. The usual dose is 50 mg. If you are over 65, have liver or kidney problems, or are taking erythromycin, ketoconazole, itraconazole, ritonavir, or saquinavir a dose of 25 mg may be sufficient. Your doctor will adjust the dosage if the drug is not working properly for you.

Take Viagra only before sexual activity. The manufacturer recommends a maximum of 1 dose per day (1 dose every 2 days for those taking ritonavir).

To avoid low blood pressure, do not take the 50-mg or 100-mg dose of Viagra within 4 hours of taking an alpha-blocking drug such as Cardura.

Side Effects.

Approximately 15% of persons taking Viagra experience side effects.

The most common side effects are:
- An inability to differentiate between the colors green and blue;
- Diarrhea;
- Facial flushing;
- Headaches;
- Nasal congestion;
- Nausea;
- Stomach pain;

Viagra side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- Urinary Tract Infection;
- Nasal Congestion;
- Headache;
- Flushing;
- Diarrhea;
- Acid Indigestion;
- Abnormal Vision (Color Tinge Blurring Sensitivity To Light);
(c) 2017